nonnaida:

Per signora. “Mark Strong”

nonnaida:

Per signora. “Mark Strong”

(via mari-m-blog)

hgwatson:

WHAT ABOUT IT?

This is actually a good short tbh

hgwatson:

WHAT ABOUT IT?

This is actually a good short tbh

(via fuckyeahmst3k)

pivotgrab:

blackbanshee:

shinobimagi:

rallyyy:

By Kouta Hirano, creator of Hellsing

I am pleased as fuck

PLEASE

(via bigbangpunch)

I am not a princess

(via elvencrowns)

thecomicartblog:

Dr. Strange by Bedlam artist,Riley Rossomo.

thecomicartblog:

Dr. Strange by Bedlam artist,Riley Rossomo.

(via thatscarybroad)

rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws
by Brian Switek 
Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.
This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.
Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …
(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)
photograph by Brian Switek

rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws

by Brian Switek 

Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.

This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.

Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …

(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)

photograph by Brian Switek

(via princeowl)

The Screaming Skull! A late-aired MST3K classic!

The Screaming Skull! A late-aired MST3K classic!

(via kungfugrift)

(via pollums)

Reblog if it’s okay to start talking to you.

Just remember I may not see it/respond because buried in PharmTech midterms or making stupid avis on Gaia (site for babbys) or watching Vinesauce while studying medical terminology livin the dream (except I can’t afford Smash Bros nooooooo)

(via thesushiowl)

(via pollums)